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Zoom -FILM PICK OF THE WEEK-
Hide Your Smiling Faces
The notion of death pervades Patrick Carbone’s lyrical debut about two brothers living in rural New Jersey whose idyllic world is shattered when they discover a dead body under a bridge. While clearly evoking the coming-of-age confusion of young kids surrounded by nature from the classic Stand By Me and the poetic naturalism of David Gordon Green’s George Washington, Hide Your Smiling Faces forges its own path as something special. 
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

-FILM PICK OF THE WEEK-

Hide Your Smiling Faces

The notion of death pervades Patrick Carbone’s lyrical debut about two brothers living in rural New Jersey whose idyllic world is shattered when they discover a dead body under a bridge. While clearly evoking the coming-of-age confusion of young kids surrounded by nature from the classic Stand By Me and the poetic naturalism of David Gordon Green’s George Washington, Hide Your Smiling Faces forges its own path as something special. 

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

04.16.14 0
Zoom DarlingChemicalia
Spun In White
8 out of 10

On the band’s latest effort Spun in White, Bone allows the collaborative vibe that permeated the edges of Valleys and Masking to fully blossom into something special. While there’s still a creepy aura and guitar drone aplenty, the album feels much more expansive than anything the band has attempted yet. Instead of drenching everything in reverb, DarlingChemicalia boldly move away from their lo-fi aesthetic by opening up their sound and allowing the members to play off each other. Every track feels carefully calibrated, but not in a way that comes across streamlined.
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

DarlingChemicalia

Spun In White

8 out of 10

On the band’s latest effort Spun in White, Bone allows the collaborative vibe that permeated the edges of Valleys and Masking to fully blossom into something special. While there’s still a creepy aura and guitar drone aplenty, the album feels much more expansive than anything the band has attempted yet. Instead of drenching everything in reverb, DarlingChemicalia boldly move away from their lo-fi aesthetic by opening up their sound and allowing the members to play off each other. Every track feels carefully calibrated, but not in a way that comes across streamlined.

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

04.10.14 1
Zoom The Grand Budapest Hotel
3.5 stars out of 4

At this point, it’s safe to say terms like “Anderson-esque” or “Wes Andersony” are a part of our movie vocabulary. It’s most often used in conduction with other films that seem, whether consciously or not, to be aping Anderson’s style. Pictures like Napoleon Dynamite, The Brothers Bloom, and Submarine could all be filed under the “Anderson-esque” label, although each have their own merits apart from any similarities to Anderson’s oeuvre. For the uninitiated, Anderson makes a very specific kind of film for a very specific kind of audience, which despite his growing popularity in more mainstream quarters, feels relegated mostly to ardent cinephiles and too cool for school faux-hipsters. This is not a criticism per se, but more of an observation on the way Anderson has created a canon that reflects the DIY sensibility and detached sense of cool that attracts the more art-minded crowd.
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

The Grand Budapest Hotel

3.5 stars out of 4

At this point, it’s safe to say terms like “Anderson-esque” or “Wes Andersony” are a part of our movie vocabulary. It’s most often used in conduction with other films that seem, whether consciously or not, to be aping Anderson’s style. Pictures like Napoleon Dynamite, The Brothers Bloom, and Submarine could all be filed under the “Anderson-esque” label, although each have their own merits apart from any similarities to Anderson’s oeuvre. For the uninitiated, Anderson makes a very specific kind of film for a very specific kind of audience, which despite his growing popularity in more mainstream quarters, feels relegated mostly to ardent cinephiles and too cool for school faux-hipsters. This is not a criticism per se, but more of an observation on the way Anderson has created a canon that reflects the DIY sensibility and detached sense of cool that attracts the more art-minded crowd.

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

04.09.14 2
Zoom Beck
Morning Phase
4 out of 10
Beck is sad. Beck is lonely. Beck is hopeful. Beck is bored.

Such sentiments, no matter how trite they initially seem, are at the heart of Morning Phase, Beck’s first album in six years, which follows in the sonic footsteps of 2002′s haunting folk-driven Sea Change. Here, the prolific singer/songwriter is grappling with middle-age with the kind of melancholy best reserved for, well, a famous musician grappling with middle-age. 
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

Beck

Morning Phase

4 out of 10

Beck is sad. Beck is lonely. Beck is hopeful. Beck is bored.

Such sentiments, no matter how trite they initially seem, are at the heart of Morning Phase, Beck’s first album in six years, which follows in the sonic footsteps of 2002′s haunting folk-driven Sea Change. Here, the prolific singer/songwriter is grappling with middle-age with the kind of melancholy best reserved for, well, a famous musician grappling with middle-age. 

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

04.05.14 1
Zoom The Wind Rises
4 stars out of 4

Whether or not The Wind Rises is indeed Hayao Miyazaki’s final film is uncertain, since there are already rumors that the Japanese animation master is tinkering with other projects, but what cannot be denied is that this is a haunting, sorrowful, and undeniably gorgeous movie. Both a love letter and a cautionary tale about the power of aeronautical engineering, The Wind Rises takes it’s time in telling the story of Jiro Horikoshi (voiced by Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the English language version) from his boyhood dreams of building airplanes to his working for Mitsubishi in developing prototypes for what will eventually be used in World War II.
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

The Wind Rises

4 stars out of 4

Whether or not The Wind Rises is indeed Hayao Miyazaki’s final film is uncertain, since there are already rumors that the Japanese animation master is tinkering with other projects, but what cannot be denied is that this is a haunting, sorrowful, and undeniably gorgeous movie. Both a love letter and a cautionary tale about the power of aeronautical engineering, The Wind Rises takes it’s time in telling the story of Jiro Horikoshi (voiced by Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the English language version) from his boyhood dreams of building airplanes to his working for Mitsubishi in developing prototypes for what will eventually be used in World War II.

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

04.03.14 5
Zoom -FILM PICK OF THE WEEK-
Visitors
Godfrey Reggio doesn’t make movies for those with short attention spans. Even though 1982′s Koyaanisqatsi was highly influential in terms of it’s reliance on pure cinematic techniques; a series of loosely connected images and time-lapse photography set to a hypnotic Philip Glass score, it was nonetheless relegated to the art house fringes. 1988′s Powaqqatsi and 2002′s Naqoyqatsi followed, completing Reggio’s trilogy highlighting man’s disconnection from nature and the role of industrialization on dwarfing the individual’s autonomy. With Visitors, he takes aim at the role technology has played in defining us as a species, though this time his ultimate message is even more cryptic.
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

-FILM PICK OF THE WEEK-

Visitors

Godfrey Reggio doesn’t make movies for those with short attention spans. Even though 1982′s Koyaanisqatsi was highly influential in terms of it’s reliance on pure cinematic techniques; a series of loosely connected images and time-lapse photography set to a hypnotic Philip Glass score, it was nonetheless relegated to the art house fringes. 1988′s Powaqqatsi and 2002′s Naqoyqatsi followed, completing Reggio’s trilogy highlighting man’s disconnection from nature and the role of industrialization on dwarfing the individual’s autonomy. With Visitors, he takes aim at the role technology has played in defining us as a species, though this time his ultimate message is even more cryptic.

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

03.26.14 0
Zoom -MUSIC PICK OF THE WEEK-
The Notwist
Close To The Glass
Formed in 1989, long before artists like The Postal Service and The Chromatics hit the scene, German four-piece The Notwist were hammering out the kind of forward thinking music that paved the way for a fusion of synthesized electronics with indie rock that eventually exploded into the mainstream. 
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

-MUSIC PICK OF THE WEEK-

The Notwist

Close To The Glass

Formed in 1989, long before artists like The Postal Service and The Chromatics hit the scene, German four-piece The Notwist were hammering out the kind of forward thinking music that paved the way for a fusion of synthesized electronics with indie rock that eventually exploded into the mainstream. 

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

03.23.14 1
Zoom -SYMBIOTIC RECOMMENDS: 10 ALBUMS, FEBRUARY 2014-Hey, check my favorite records from February! It’s a sonic overload not heard since last time I posted my monthly picks. Get lost in auditory heaven.Check out album recommendations here!

-SYMBIOTIC RECOMMENDS: 10 ALBUMS, FEBRUARY 2014-

Hey, check my favorite records from February! It’s a sonic overload not heard since last time I posted my monthly picks. Get lost in auditory heaven.

Check out album recommendations here!

03.20.14 0
Zoom A Field In England
3.5 stars out of 4
A disheveled man under extreme panic stumbles out of a darkened jungle of underbrush, clasping his hands tightly over his ears in an attempt to drown out the deafening sounds of unseen warfare. This is the first scene of Ben Wheatley’s utterly unclassifiable new film A Field in England, and in it’s own specific way, it prepares viewers (or leaves them at a loss), to take in the absolutely mad shenanigans that unfurl over the picture’s 90-minute running time.
READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

A Field In England

3.5 stars out of 4

A disheveled man under extreme panic stumbles out of a darkened jungle of underbrush, clasping his hands tightly over his ears in an attempt to drown out the deafening sounds of unseen warfare. This is the first scene of Ben Wheatley’s utterly unclassifiable new film A Field in England, and in it’s own specific way, it prepares viewers (or leaves them at a loss), to take in the absolutely mad shenanigans that unfurl over the picture’s 90-minute running time.

READ FULL REVIEW HERE!

03.19.14 2
Zoom -REVIEWS AT A GLANCE: FEBRUARY 2014-
Do yourself a favor and check out what I’ve been watching and listening to during the month of February, including 5 recently released films and 5 brand new albums!
What have you been watching and listening to?
Check out article here!

-REVIEWS AT A GLANCE: FEBRUARY 2014-

Do yourself a favor and check out what I’ve been watching and listening to during the month of February, including 5 recently released films and 5 brand new albums!

What have you been watching and listening to?

Check out article here!

03.10.14 0